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Influence of Stereotypes in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Essay examples

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Introduction
Section One: Harper Lee’s Life
Section Two: Time Period Influences on Lee’s Writing
Section Three: Influence of Stereotypes
Section Four: To Kill a Mockingbird Reviews
Conclusion
Works Cited

Introduction
Which doll is better? In the 1950s, psychologists Kenneth and Mamie Clark asked black children between three and seven to answer this simple, yet revealing question. The kids were shown four dolls that were exactly the same except for their skin colors. Almost three quarters of the children chose the white doll as being superior and attributed positive characteristics to it. When asked why they picked it, they replied with, “Because it’s white” (Abagond). Almost half a century later, in 2005, Kiri Davis repeated the test to see if psychology has changed in any way. Results show 71% of the children preferring the white doll (Edne). These tests demonstrate the incredible stereotypical beliefs still present today. The belief that there is only one acceptable perception to anything is ingrained into society’s minds, and limits individuals from thinking for themselves. Author Harper Lee explores this topic as she displays to readers prevalent stereotypes and their effects in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird.

Section One: Harper Lee’s Life
Harper Lee was born April 28th, 1926 in Monroeville, Alabama. Lee’s father, Amasa Coleman (A.C.) Lee, was a former newspaper editor who served as a state senator and lawyer. Due to his occupations, A.C. had a tremendous influence on her writing. Not only is A.C. a writer just like Lee; but, the main character in Lee’s novel, Scout Finches’, father, Atticus, also practices law. Atticus defends a black man accused of raping a white woman who is found guilty and murdered. Simil...


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...ompany, 1960.
McLeod, Saul. "Asch Experiment." SimplyPsychology. N.p., 2008. Web. 04 Feb. 2014. .
Pauli, Michelle. "Harper Lee Tops Librarians' Must-read List." Theguardian.com. Guardian News and Media, 02 Mar. 2006. Web. 05 Feb. 2014.
"POLL FINDS WHITES USE STEREOTYPES." The New York Times. The New York Times, 10 Jan. 1991. Web. 09 Feb. 2014. .
"The Scottsboro Case | The Nation." The Scottsboro Case | The Nation. N.p., 31 Aug. 2010. Web. 09 Feb. 2014. .
Shmoop Editorial Team. "Harper Lee: Childhood." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 08 Feb. 2014. .
Teen Help Blog." Teen Help Blog. N.p., 28 Dec. 2011. Web. 19 Feb. 2014.


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