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Essay on The Iliad

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The Iliad

The Iliad is the first written document, of anything. Never before the Iliad was the tool of writing used to such an extent. The Iliad is a marvelous piece of work. Great in its fame and content, the Iliad was used as the first historical text, philosophical writing, and storybook. Historians use it for an account of an era. Philosophers use it as one of the basis of human thought. To children, it is a wonderful story of battles between man and their gods. It is a writing of many uses. One such use of the Iliad is that it is an illustration of humanity. It is an illustration that a man or womans life exists with conflict. The Iliad illustrates that it is human nature to create and live with conflicts, whether by choice or not, in order to have purpose in life. Humanity creates conflict by means of external and internal struggles, conflicts in humanitys own created ideas, conflicts in love, and even in times of peace, man create conflict.
In terms of external struggles, humanity creates his own external conflicts to bring about resolution to a present problem if a peaceful solution cannot be found. In the Iliad, the war between the Achaeans and Trojans began after Helen left with Paris for Troy. The fight for Helen between two men escalated to a war between two civilizations. Menelaos feelings for Helen did not allow him to just let her go without any trouble. Instead, he and Agamemnon rallied the entire Achaean civilization to fight Troy in order to bring Helen and her riches back. A peaceful solution was not found before the war began. Paris would not return Helen. To solve this turmoil, the war was brought about. A famous comedian, Martin Lawrence, was quoted to have said, Cant we all just get ...


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...e United States have jobs, which keep them at work from nine in the morning to five oclock in the afternoon. It is call the Rat Race, and to many, it does not sound like a very meaningful life to lead.
There is always the eternal question that is pondered throughout time: what makes a good life? Whether you had riches or lived poorly but happily, you get problems. Whether you made a difference in the world as a scientist or lived a peaceful life in the country, you have had your share of conflicts. Whether people encourage or discourage conflicts and problems, they exist. Conflicts can range from taking part in a war against a dictator to deciding who is the right man or woman for ones affections. It is human nature to create conflict whether by choice or with the help of fate. Thus, conflict must then exist as an essential part of humanitys own existence.


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