Preview
Preview

Essay on How the Earl Warren Court Liberalized America

No Works Cited
Length: 834 words (2.4 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The Warren Court refers to the Supreme Court of the United States between 1953 and 1969, when Earl Warren served as Chief Justice. Warren led a liberal majority that used judicial power in dramatic fashion, to the consternation of conservative opponents. The Warren Court expanded civil rights, civil liberties, judicial power, and the federal power in dramatic ways. One way the Warren Court liberalized America, is through the court cases of Gideon v. Wainwright (1963), Escobedo v. Illinois (1964), and Miranda v. Arizona (1966), where these court cases helped define Due Process and the rights of defendants. Another way the Warren Court liberalized America, is through the cases of Tinker v. Des Moines ISD (1969), Engle v. Vitale (1962), and New York Times v. Sullivan (1964), where the Supreme Court sought to expand the scope of application of the First Amendment, however also limiting those freedoms as well. Lastly, the third way the Warren Court liberalized America, is through the issues of the right to privacy, Griswold v. Connecticut (1965), the incorporation of the exclusionary rule, Mapp v. Ohio (1961), and lastly the banning of segregation in public schools, Brown v. Board of Education (1954).
The cases of Gideon v. Wainwright (1963), Escobedo v. Illinois (1964) and Miranda v. Arizona (1966), all helped define Due Process and the rights of defendants. In the court case of Gideon v. Wainwright, the Supreme Court ruled that if the defendant can not afford an attorney, then one will be provided for them. Also, under the Supreme Court’s ruling of the case of Miranda v. Arizona, meaning that when arrested, your basic rights must be stated, that you have the right to remain silent and that anything you say can and will be used in co...


... middle of paper ...


...r the court case of Mapp v. Ohio.
The Warren Court liberalized America in many ways, what with the cases of Miranda v. Arizona, Gideon v. Wainwright, and Escobedo v. Illinois, where the Supreme Court helped to define Due Process and the defendants’ rights. Also the issues of the rights or freedoms listed in the 1st Amendment helped the Warren Court liberalize America, since each case focused on a certain freedom, Tinker v. Des Moines ISD (freedom of speech), New York Times v. Sullivan (freedom of the press), and also the limitation of the freedom of religion under the court case of Engle v. Vitale. Lastly, the Warren Court liberalized America, since it helped change so much, with the cases of Brown v. Board of Education (segregation of public schools), Griswold v. Connecticut (right to privacy), and finally Mapp v. Ohio (the incorporation of the exclusionary rule).



Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »
title







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Essay on The Warren Court - The US Supreme Court was created in Article III of the Constitution and has the ultimate authority on the interpretation of constitutional law and is therefore deemed the highest court in the nation (USSC). The Supreme Court consists of a chief justice and eight associate justices who review cases from lower courts throughout the nation and rule on the constitutionality of the issues (Urofsky, 2001). The Supreme Court plays a large role in the American legal system because its rulings become law, affecting subsequent cases throughout the nation....   [tags: Politics, government, Supreme Court]
:: 7 Works Cited
1942 words
(5.5 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Burger Court Essay - Warren Earl Burger was born September 17th, 1907 in St. Paul, Minnesota. He was of Swiss and German ancestry and served as the 15th Chief Justice to the United States Supreme Court. After graduating from St. Paul College of Law in 1931, the lifelong republican held many various positions in the legal system while working his way to the top. Burger focused mainly in the areas of corporate law, real estate and probate law, while at the same time becoming involved in politics. Furthermore, he was involved in many successful campaigns which brought attention to himself by prominent republicans....   [tags: Biography, Warren Earl Burger] 1476 words
(4.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Legend on the Bench: Ending Segregation in US School Public Education - It was a cool spring evening in Washington, D.C. The usual crop of reporters was stationed at the Supreme Court building, but they expected no news to come from the court that day. Their presumption proved to be sorely untrue, as the Court’s press secretary ushered the journalists into the courtroom to hear one of the most significant rulings in the history of the Supreme Court. After only five months in office, Chief Justice Earl Warren was able to give his court’s unanimous decision in the famous Brown v....   [tags: supreme court, earl warren]
:: 3 Works Cited
1415 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on Earl Warren: Changing America through Judicial Power - Earl Warren: Changing America through Judicial Power History does not happen in an instant; history is made through the impacts on the national and international level. Often times, it is one small event that triggers a large reaction from the public. Furthermore, it is one person who can make a difference in the world. Earl Warren was one person who helped shape Americans in the mid-1900s. From working in a law office to becoming the governor of California and finally being appointed as Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1953, Earl Warren had built up tremendous support....   [tags: black and white citizens, police warnings]
:: 23 Works Cited
2049 words
(5.9 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Essay on Earl Warren: Chief Justice for the United States - History isn’t made when it happens; it’s made because of the impacts on the national and international level. Often times, it is a small event that triggers a large reaction from the public. Often times, it is one person who can make a difference in the world. Earl Warren was one person that made a difference to Americans in the mid-1900s. From working in a law office to becoming the governor of California to appointed Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1953, Earl Warren had built up tremendous support....   [tags: Discrimination, Law, Changes] 743 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Chief Justice Earl Warren Essay - Chief Justice Earl Warren Earl Warren was born March 19, 1891 in Los Angeles, California. Earl’s father was a Norwegian immigrant, which left him dealing with prejudice and equal rights at a very young age (Grace, 1). This lead to early indications that law would be Earl’s profession. Even before entering High School, he listened to criminal cases at the Kern County courthouse. Attending the University of California at Berkeley, Warren worked his way through college. He majored in political science for three years before entering the law school at UC....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 9 Works Cited
1380 words
(3.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Judicial Review of the Warren Court - AP Government Term Paper In the 1920’s a heightened suspicion of communist activities on domestic American land arose, the Red Scare. Benjamin Gitlow, a prominent member of the Socialist party, was arrested and convicted on charges of violating the New York Criminal Anarchy Law of 1902 during these drastic times. What was his violation. The publication and circulation of the Left-Wing Manifesto, a mere pamphlet, in the United States was his infringement. He appealed the decision on the basis that it violated his First Amendment rights of freedom of speech and press and it was passed on to the United States Supreme Court....   [tags: Political Science Politics] 1556 words
(4.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about The River Warren and the Struggling Farmer - The River Warren and the Struggling Farmer The alarm clock sounds every morning at five o'clock, not a Sony or any other form of electrical device, but the sounds of the roosters crowing and horses scurrying around the dew filled pasture eagerly awaiting their morning grain. One can hardly ignore crashing and banging sounds that the hogs make as they lift their feeder covers with their noses and bounce them up and down to alert their owner he is late for breakfast again. As the farmer stumbles out of bed, he is greeted by tantalizing aroma of fresh coffee and his wife's award winning biscuits....   [tags: Warren] 1825 words
(5.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Sad Farmers in The River Warren - Sad Farmers in The River Warren As farmers and small farming communities become more and more distanced from the land and one another, a greater dissatisfaction results in the farmer's perception of his/her life. In Kent Meyers' novel, "The River Warren," Two-Speed Crandall becomes a victim of this trend. To understand why this dissatisfaction is becoming more prevalent, we must look at the decline of more traditional methods of farming in favor of contemporary agriculture. Also, we must explore the disintegration of community in the lives of rural farmers....   [tags: Warren] 1750 words
(5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay about The Rural Way of Life in The River Warren - The Rural Way of Life in The River Warren Anyone who has taken a trip across the midwestern states has seen a different way of life. The River Warren gave the readers a sense of this rural way of life around the Two-Speed semi crash. Corn, wheat, and other agricultural products can be seen for miles and miles in all directions. As you drive through, you can see farmers hard at work, combines, tractors, and bailers all working at full speed, sun up to sun down. It doesn't take long too see how much these farms must work in order to survive....   [tags: warren] 1111 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]