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General Criticism of Araby by James Joyce Essay

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Where does the beginning come from in every story and what influences the authors to include details and write the way they do? How do they know what to write about when for some the words just do not come? Life experiences, history, family history and events around them in the time are four of some of the biggest reasons authors put their thoughts and feelings on paper.
What affected James Joyces’ writing most were the events going around him in Europe during the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. However, his own experiences had an impact in his style and writing material. Joyce was born in 1882 in Dublin Ireland and lived through reformations, wars, and trails until he died in Zürich in 1941. He was a man much in to politics and was much interested how a country was being led. In the year 1914, James wrote 15 short stories known as Dubliners, which also includes the short story “Araby” (Thomas). “Araby” is a short story in which he writes describing a young lad’s curiosity and naïve experience with love and in which he describes his personal life as a boy . Ireland was not always free and independent as it is now. England had control of Ireland since it took control in 1798 (Allison). This had a big effect in the life of James for all his childhood their country was under the control of a foreign hand. When Joyce first published his short stories, there were uprisings in the countries around since that same year, World War 1 started. Because of the turmoil in the countries about, Joyce had fit these events in with his pieces of fiction.
Culture, where and how a person is raised, affects a person no matter how much they dislike the way they are being taught the ways of life. However, moving to different places as a child and coun...


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...o see two wars, multitudes of countries and, in a way, was oppressed by a foreign power.



Works Cited

"A Brief Biography of James Joyce." Joyce. The James Joyce Centre, 2011. Web. 14 Jan 2011.
Allison, Fiona. "The Irish War of Independence 1919-1921." suite101.com. suite101, 11 Jan 2010. Web. 16 Jan 2011.
Connor, Steven. James Joyce. Plymouth: Northcote House publishers, 1996. Print
Joyce, James. “Araby.” Literature: The Human Experience. Abcarian, Richard et al.,. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2010. 92-96
Kiberd, Declan. Ulysess and Us. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2009. Print
O’Brien, Edna. James Joyce. New York: Viking Penguin, 1999. Print
Peterson, Richard F. James Joyce, Revisited. New York: Twayne Publishers, 1992. Print
Thomas, Steve. "Dubliners by James Joyce." ebooks@Adelaide. The University of Adelaide, 23 Aug 2010. Web. 20 Jan 2011


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