Preview
Preview

Freedom of Speech: The First Amendment

:: 11 Works Cited
Length: 1635 words (4.7 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Blue      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

When the Constitution of the United States was ratified it mainly addressed the structure of the government with very few liberties for the individual. However, the states demanded a bill of rights that addressed the rights of the individuals as well. As a result, the Constitution began to adapt and change by adding amendments. Today the Bill of Rights still continues to change based on the will of the people and the judgment of the U.S. Supreme Court however, the core principles that our country was founded on has remained the same. There are currently 27 amendments to the Constitution of the United States all of which address the structure of the federal government, its functions, the powers of the states, and the liberty of all citizens. Among those amendments are: the freedom to petition and assemble, freedom of religion, the right to bear arms, the right of freedom of speech, and many more. The first amendment to the Bill of Rights is the right to freedom of speech and press which “protects individual expression by guaranteeing the freedom of speech. The Supreme Court has broadly interpreted “speech” to include Internet communication, art, music, clothing, and even “symbolic speech,” such as flag burning. Freedom of the press generally allows for newspapers, radio, television, and now many online sources to publish articles and express opinions representing the public dialogue without interference or constraint by the government” (Know Your Rights, 2). Today, we are in danger of losing some of our constitutional rights due to government censorship. There are special interest groups that are fighting to change our right to freely represent ourselves and our right to freedom of speech. We must protect our constitutional rights ...


... middle of paper ...


...om. Web. 4 May 2014.
Hentoff, Nathan (Nat) Irvin. “Expelling ‘Huck Finn’.” washingtonpost.com. N.p. 27 Nov. 1999. Web. 2 May 2014.
“Know Your Rights.” The United States Department of Justice. justice.gov. N.p. Web 29 Apr. 2014
Milton, John. “The Areopagitica.” Saint Lawrence Institute For the Advancement of Learning. stlawrenceinstitute.org. Ed. Sid Parkinson. Web. 27 Apr. 2014.
Roosevelt, Eleanor. “Eleanor Roosevelt Biography.” biography.com. N.p, Web. 30 Apr. 2014.
Stanford University. stanford.edu. Web 4 May 2014.
“Transparency Report.” Google. google.com. Web. 5 May 2014.
“Why Are Human Rights Important.” Detention Watch Network. detentionwatchnetwork.org. Web. 1 May 2014.
Uleman, Gerald. “The Price of Free Speech: Campus Hate Speech Codes.” The Informed Argument. 8th ed. Ed. Robert P. Yagelski and Robert K. Miller. Belmont, MA: Wadsworth. 2012. 353-56 Print.



Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
The Constitutionality of Separation of Church and State, Freedom of Speech, and the First Amendment in Times of War - The United States Constitution was originally drafted in 1787 and this did not contain the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights was ratified December 15, 1791 (McClenaghan 71). At that time, George Mason and others argued that it should not be included (Bender 27). James Madison believed that adding a bill of rights could give the government powers to take away people’s private rights (Madison 44). He stated that wherever power gives people the right to do something wrong, wrong doings will be done (Madison 44)....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
:: 19 Works Cited
1462 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay about Analysis of The case of the Pledge of Allegiance - The primary goal of this essay is to examine whether the first amendment goes too far in protecting free speech, like the case of the Pledge of Allegiance. Therefore, to establish this argument, this essay will first consider the speech overview, as well as the limitations. Subsequently, the essay would also put into consideration the aspects of Freedom in the Classroom. Basing my work on the “first amendment does not go too far in protecting free speech in the case of the Pledge of Allegiance” as the claim; my essay would revolve around the components of both the Speech Overview, as well as the Freedom in the Classroom....   [tags: first amendment, free speech, freedom]
:: 2 Works Cited
960 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Freedom of Speech vs Censorship - We are blessed to live in a country that has many rights, the most important is the freedom of speech which provides an umbrella of protection over our remaining rights; however, all of our rights are under attack beginning with the First Amendment which is under constant assault by censorship. The Constitution of the United States says that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” Censorship as defined by Wikipedia is “the suppression of speech or dele...   [tags: First Amendment]
:: 4 Works Cited
1223 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on First Amendment and the Constitutional Freedoms in Amercan Schools - The First Amendment, usually equated with freedom of speech, affords five protections: Establishment Clause, Free exercise of religion, Freedom of speech, Freedom of press, and Freedom to peaceable assemble. Students (and student groups) in public colleges and universities enjoy full protection under the First Amendment; however, this right depends greatly on the context in which a student might raise a free speech claim. Once an institution creates a limited public forum for a student or group, administration cannot deny recognition to particular student or groups based on viewpoints....   [tags: freedom of speech, constitutional freedoms] 1264 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Should There Be Restrictions to Freedom of Speech - Should there be restrictions to freedom of speech synonyms, and is there a scarcity of freedom that is given to individuals. Freedom to the people has been Americas greatest accomplishment, yet the checks and balances placed between the lines of freedom are not defined. Obscenity speeches are defined as outside the boundaries of the First Amendment protection. Libel and Slander of public figures must be proven by malice; the reckless disregard for the truth. Commercial speeches can be banned by the government as illegal if the information if deceptive to the readers....   [tags: first amendment, slander] 537 words
(1.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about The Infringement Of The First Amendment In High School Theatre - In the landmark case Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969), John Tinker and his siblings decided to openly protest the Vietnam War by wearing black armbands to school (Goldman 1). The school felt that their efforts to protest the war disrupted the school environment. “The Supreme Court said that ‘in our system, undifferentiated fear or apprehension of disturbance is not enough to overcome the right to freedom of expression.’ School officials cannot silence student speech simply because they dislike it or it is controversial or unpopular” (FAQs 2)....   [tags: Freedom of Speech] 1271 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Gregory Lee Johnson's Freedom Court Case Essay - The United States first amendment states, congress cannot pass a law prohibiting a citizen’s freedom of speech. In 1984, Gregory Lee Johnson burned an American flag to protest against Reagan during the republican national convention. He was arrested and charged with abuse of an item if the action were to provoke anger in others. Texas court tried and convicted Johnson, he appealed claiming that his behavior was protected by the first amendment. The Supreme Court agreed to hear his case. The issue was whether flag burning compromises emblematic speech secured by the first amendment....   [tags: free speech, first amendment, flag burning]
:: 2 Works Cited
880 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The First Amendment Essay - In America the Amendment 1 of the U.S. Constitution gives the American people the right to peaceably assemble and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. Most notably Amendment 1 is known for and most often cited as giving the Freedom of Speech. Even before this amendment was ratified people in the U.S. were protesting, as in the Boston Tea Party. Protesting has been a way to effect change in America. A question to ask is this: is there a right way or wrong way to protest. Others protest that has had an effect on America since the Amendment was ratified are protest against war such as Vietnam and Desert Shield/Desert Storm, Civil Rights Movement, and more recently the prot...   [tags: Freedom of Speech]
:: 1 Works Cited
630 words
(1.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Political Correctness or Freedom of Speech - The term political correctness (PC) has infringed on our freedom of speech by assuming that the populace is too ignorant to realize what appropriate speech is. This term is now as common in our society as the term, ‘freedom of speech’. It is incomprehensible how these two words have had such an effect on the manner in which our society communicates. The trend casts a negative view on our society by letting political views determine what is appropriate in our social sector. Political correctness, as applied in today’s society, seeks to control freedom of speech and poses a true danger to a free society....   [tags: Freedom of Speech]
:: 11 Works Cited
1460 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Freedom of Speech - Imagine a time when one could be fined, imprisoned and even killed for simply speaking one’s mind. Speech is the basic vehicle for communication of beliefs, thoughts and ideas. Without the right to speak one’s mind freely one would be forced to agree with everything society stated. With freedom of speech one’s own ideas can be expressed freely and the follower’s belief will be stronger. The words sound so simple, but without them the world would be a very different place. Without the right to speak freely one would not be able to debt, nor would one be able to receive full coverage on world issues....   [tags: First Amendment Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1581 words
(4.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]