Preview
Preview

Essay about The First Amendment of the United States Constitution

:: 7 Works Cited
Length: 1064 words (3 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The United States Constitution was signed on September 17th, 1787. It did not include a bill of rights and it did not include their freedoms. And so, on September 25, 1789 Congress passed the first ten amendments, which were later ratified on December 15, 1791. The Bill of Rights was created by the Founding Fathers with the intent of restricting the powers of the new national government. The Bill of Rights, however, consists of 10 amendments. The first of the amendments was written because the people at America’s establishment wanted their basic freedoms guaranteed. Thus, the first freedoms guaranteed to citizens were written by James Madison and are now known as the First Amendment. “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.”
The First Amendment of the United States Constitution protects and guarantees the freedoms of citizens. That being said, the court cases dealing with the 1st amendment involve a violation of either a freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly and or petition. And so, cases regarding religion deal with prayer in public schools, limiting the right to deny medical care for religious purposes, there being an official government church and the ability for citizens to worship as they please. Cases on the topic of free speech deal with symbolic speech, such as flag burning, and pure speech-verbal speech expressed before a voluntary audience. Many of the same things that deal with the freedom of speech also deal with the freedom of press. However, the freedom of press also deals with pr...


... middle of paper ...


...st Amendment Center." First Amendment Center. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Mar. 2014. .

"First Amendment." LII / Legal Information Institute. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Mar. 2014. .

"GITLOW v. NEW YORK." Gitlow v. New York. N.p., n.d. Web. Mar. 2014. .

Lewis, Anthony. Make No Law: The Sullivan Case and the First Amendment. New York: Random House, 1991. Print.

McBride, Alex. "Schenck v US (1919)." PBS. PBS, n.d. Web. 27 Mar. 2014. .

Urofsky, Melvin I. "New York Times Co. v. Sullivan (law Case)." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica, n.d. Web. Mar. 2014. .



Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Essay on The First Amendment to the United States Constitution - December 15, 1791 the First Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech." At an absolute minimum, the Establishment Clause was intended to prohibit the federal government from declaring and financially supporting a national religion, such as existed in many other countries at the time of the nation's founding (University of Missouri-Kansas City, 2011)....   [tags: American History] 2214 words
(6.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Constitution and Freedom of Religion in the United States Essay - For millennia, man has persecuted himself for religion. This was due to his inability to accept other beliefs, which led to distrust, alarm, and suspicion. In its most extreme form, persecution resulted in expulsion from countries and genocide. However, as western man became more civilized, this behavior was deemed deplorable. Therefore, religious persecution morphed into a more socially acceptable pattern- discrimination. Thistransition stemmed from the establishment of the Constitution of the United States that guaranteed religious freedom....   [tags: First Amendment, Religious tolerance]
:: 13 Works Cited
1081 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The US Constitution: The Difficulty of Adding an Amendment Essay - The United States Constitution is considered to be more concise as well as much older than the constitutions of other nations worldwide. Although the United States Constitution is mature, there are such a limited number of amendments that have been added to the Constitution since it was created. Only twenty-seven amendments, including the Bill of Rights, have been added to the Constitution since its creation. This is not due to amendments not being suggested, because over eleven thousand amendments have been contemplated; however, this is because the process of adding an amendment to the Constitution is an extremely long and difficult process....   [tags: american history, amendment]
:: 1 Works Cited
1000 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about The First Amendment - The First Amendment is the first section of the Bill of Rights and is often considered the most important part of the U.S Constitution because it guarantees the citizens of United States the essential personal freedoms of religion, speech, press, peaceful assembly and the freedom to petition the Government. Thanks to the rights granted by the First Amendment, Americans are able to live in a country where they can freely express themselves, speak their mind, pray without interference, protest in peace and where their opinions are taken into consideration, which is something not many other nationalities have the fortune of saying....   [tags: bill of rights, constitution, Madison]
:: 4 Works Cited
886 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Importance of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution - The importance of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution is such that some have called it the amendment that “completed the Constitution.” When it was ratified on July 9th, 1868, the amendment became one of legislative cornerstones of the Reconstruction Era, a time in which the Radical Republicans, led by John A. Bingham and Thaddeus Stevens, promulgated a legislative program focused on providing racial equality before the law. Among the laws passed in the Reconstruction Era, the Fourteenth Amendment was one of the most controversial, with one Republican congressman, Representative A.J....   [tags: reconstruction era, 14th amendment]
:: 13 Works Cited
2896 words
(8.3 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Amendments to the Constitution Essay - The framers of our Constitution knew that time has a way of changing countries and their citizens. Our country was in a whirlwind of change in 1789 as people were experiencing freedom from the tyranny of England for the first time in their lives. Our country was being molded and formed into a great nation by the founding fathers. Expectations and rules had to be set to protect the rights of the minorities and majorities. Amendments to the Constitution were written to ensure equality for all in changing times....   [tags: First Amendment, Second Amendment] 1302 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Importance of the First Amendment of the United States’ Bill of Rights for Democratic Government and its Citizens - Being expression one of the most important rights of the people to maintain a connected society right to speech should be accepted to do so. The first amendment is one of the most fundamental rights that individuals have. It is fundamental to the existence of democracy and the respect of human dignity. This amendment describes the principal rights of the citizens of the United States. If the citizens were unable to criticize the government, it would be impossible to regulate order. By looking freedom of speech there is also freedom of assembly and freedom of press that are crucial for the United States democracy. According to the “Derechos, Human Rights”, freedom of speech is one of the most...   [tags: First Amendment, USA, Bill of Rights, Democracy, G] 780 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Fourteenth Amendment to the US Constitution Essay - The Fourteenth Amendment What amendment to the United States constitution is considered to be illegally ratified. What amendment both grants the right to vote to men and then takes away that right to vote. If you answered the fourteenth amendment to both questions you would be right. Although most people think of the fourteenth amendment as being a "civil rights" amendment, it also defines citizenship, voting rights, and states congressional representatives and electors numbers. In this paper I will talk about how the passage of the fourteenth amendment was a relevant event in history, how it impacts our country today, how it is viewed as the civil rights amendment in our textbook, how it h...   [tags: Political Science] 1434 words
(4.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The First Amendment Essay - Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people to assemble peacefully, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. The first and the most significant of the amendments to our Constitution is the First Amendment. "The amendment that established our freedoms as citizens of our new confederation." The First Amendment insures freedom of speech and of the press....   [tags: Constitution US History Government] 1163 words
(3.3 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The First Amendment Essay - The First Amendment America was built on freedom. Freedom to speak, freedom to choose, freedom to worship, and freedom to do just about anything you want within the law. America’s law was designed to protect and preserve these freedoms. The reason the United States of America came to exist was because the colonists fled Great Britain to get back the freedoms that were taken away from them by the Monarchy. In countries where Monarchies and Dictatorships rule, there is little if any freedom to speak of....   [tags: Bill Rights Constitution Government USA Essays] 552 words
(1.6 pages)
Good Essays [preview]