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Divine Rescue: A Pathway Forged by the First Great Awakening Essay

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“Walking with God is like a spiritual roller coaster.” Statements like this unrealistically express the experience people have in the “highs and lows” of a particular religious relationship. In fact, evangelism does not decline. Perhaps it levels out for a period of time, but eventually it continues to progress in swift, expansive phases (Worrell 4). When a civilization experiences an amount of time in religious staleness, it is imminent that it will, in time, intensify into what is generally referred to as an awakening (4). These high points are surrounded by semi-specific forerunning circumstances and results that not only benefit the individuals directly involved, but also have far reaching social and economic implications that can either help or harm the third party.
One of the first major indications that an awakening is going to occur is when a people group feels oppressed by the church and seeks to remove themselves from religion in general (Reedy 1). Puritan theology played a large role making this happen. Their doctrine taught people to focus more on tangible acts than faith. With this mindset, they had no guarantee of salvation (1). In fact, they believed God picks and chooses who is saved as opposed to the notion of “faith saves all” (1). This undoubtedly gave the colonists a very depressing outlook on life. Equally as bleak was the idea of deism prevalent during the 1700s (1). This concept is often equated to the analogy of a clockmaker. Deists believe that, like a clockmaker, God “wound up” the universe and just let it go, leaving humans to fend for themselves and deal with their own problems. In this view, God acts completely separate from humanity, giving colonial life an even more miserable, helpless atmosphere.
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...England (Reedy 2). This assured that once the revolution occurred, the new nation would be formed on the basis of Christianity and eventually the constitution would be written in light of God’s Word. This set of circumstances put the United States on the right path to success because God’s hand was instrumental in the foundation of the country long before the colonists had their freedom. It is fair to say that without the Great Awakening, America would have become an alarmingly different place.



Works Cited

DeArtega, William. Quenching the Spirit:Discover the Real Spirit behind the Charasmatic
Controversy. Orlando: Creation House, 1992. 28-60. Print.
Reedy, Thomas. "The First Great Awakening Background Notes." Missouri , Lee's Summit. 26 2012.
Lecture.
Worrell, George. America's Great Awakenings. Dallas: Baptist General Convention of Texas, 1987. 4-8.
Print.



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