Preview
Preview

Deborah Tannen’s Marked Women and Virginia Woolf’s Professions for Women

:: 2 Works Cited
Length: 905 words (2.6 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

It is as if a window finally cracks open revealing the sun’s rays brightening with the truth that men and women experience different challenges. Deborah Tannen’s Marked Women has to face the music when applied to Virginia Woolf’s Professions for Women. In Tannen’s essay the claim that “[t]here is no unmarked women” has trouble withstanding but manages to hold up Woolf’s position of the battle women fought against the traditional norm to the freedom they can possess.
First and foremost, Tannen claims that all women are “unmarked” and that leaves the essay with room for doubt. The manner in which she only observes the women in the meeting signifies that she is more drawn to look at how differently each women looks. The term “marked” in Tannen’s essay “It refers to the way language alters the base meaning of a word by adding a linguistic particle that has no meaning on its own” (Tannen 295). The definition of “marked” allows for men to have the unmarked case. Tannen asserts “Each of the women at the conference had to make decisions about hair, clothing, makeup and accessories, and each decision carried meaning” (Tannen 295). The meaning would imply that no physical display could be unnoticed leaving no ideal of a standard look the way men have. Tannen states “Their hair obstructed no views, left little to toss or push back or run fingers through and, consequently, needed and attracted no attention” (Tanned 295). The similarity in each of the men in the meeting left no desire to look upon and only left the women to be distinguished. The reflection that women have in her essay to have no choice but accept that they are “unmarked” leaves her argument in possible strain against Woolf.
Nevertheless, Woolf’s Professions for Women is a...


... middle of paper ...


...eparated women from the workplace broke down but the ability to go beyond that is constantly in need of work.
Ultimately, the argument that “[t]here is no unmarked women” struggled but managed to be enough to hold up when used with Woolf’s Professions for Women. The struggle that women must face for not being “unmarked” does not keep them from rising above. Even being from different eras, Tannen was able to apply her argument with Woolf’s and reveals another window that shines brightly for the future of women everywhere.






Works Cited

Kirszner, Laurie G., and Stephen R. Mandell. "Marked Women." The Blair reader: exploring issues and ideas. 7th ed. Boston: Prentice Hall, 2011. 294-298. Print.
Kirszner, Laurie G., and Stephen R. Mandell. "Professions for Women." The Blair reader: exploring issues and ideas. 7th ed. Boston: Prentice Hall, 2011. 410-414. Print.



Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Article Critique of Deborah Tannen's "Marked Women" Essay - In the Article “marked women”, Deborah Tannen explains the social manner of judging women by their appearance or other factors, but not judging men for the same reasons. Tannen uses her observation during a conference meeting of four women and eight men to analyze how each woman in the meeting was marked while men were not. Again Deborah points out the issue of how one gender writing about the other is either portrayed as prejudiced or sexist. The author explains that men have the freedom to wear what they want without much meaning being read from their clothes, but for a woman every style has a meaning....   [tags: sexism, women's studies] 840 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Life and Work of Virginia Woolf Essays - From the early death of her mother at age 13 to the sexual abuse from her own half brothers led to the many mental and emotional breakdowns that made Virginia Woolf, “one of the greatest novelists of the twentieth century…” (“Virginia Woolf” n.page.). Woolf’s, “Kew Gardens”, is a classic short story written in 1919 that shows the importance of women’s rights and illustrates that even when you are surrounded by people you still can feel empty and alone. This significant story reflects Virginia’s life filled with depression even though she was a great success and had a happy marriage....   [tags: Virginia Woolf, ]
:: 1 Works Cited
1357 words
(3.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Phantoms of Society in Virginia Woolf´s Progessions for Women Essay - Human beings find the expected so comforting. People want to be prepared for any catastrophe and keep chaos in the world under control, but this strategy is flawed. In the conquest for control, humans have created an ideal of how life should be, and phantoms are formed from this ideal. Doris Lessing’s “To Room Nineteen” and Under Milk Wood by Dylan Thomas are both examples of how different people live with ambiguity. However, Virginia Woolf’s “Professions for Women” most clearly explains how society’s ideals affect its members....   [tags: ideals, society, ambiguity, control, expected] 814 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Rhetorical Analysis on Virginia Woolf´s Speech Professions for Women - ... “You are able, though not without great labour and effort, to pay the rent. You are earning your five hundred pounds a year. But this freedom is only a beginning—the room is your own, but it is still bare. It has to be furnished; it has to be decorated; it has to be shared.” In this, she not only speaks of the physical rooms itself that these women are finally able to afford due to their own efforts, but the “rooms” or empty spaces in these women’s identities and the difficult task that they face in confronting old traditions and perspectives so that they are able to reconcile their past with their view of their future....   [tags: society, desire, metaphor] 874 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Duchess And The Jeweler by Virginia Woolf Essay - The Duchess and the Jeweler is the story of the world's greatest jeweler who had promised his mother to become the richest jeweler in the world in his childhood but now that his dream has materialized he does not feel satisfied. So trying to achieve satisfaction, knowingly he buys fake pearls from a Duchess in exchange for passing a whole weekend with her daughter whom he is in love with. The purpose of this essay is to show how Virginia Woolf has successfully presented the inner mind of the characters, their struggle and their communication through the least amount of verbal communication among them....   [tags: Virginia Woolf Duchess Jeweler] 1572 words
(4.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Woolf's Advice for the Woman Artist Essay - Women who want to escape the label "woman writer" (as opposed to writer--the masculine norm) have had to write like one of the boys, de-sexing themselves. Super-feminine lady writers, if they stick to their nice nook, will be both praised and despised for doing what comes naturally. But the woman writer who refuses these categories blows the scheme sky-high and incurs the wrath of the gods. (Michele Roberts in The Independent, 1997) Perhaps more than any other late-twentieth century British woman writer, Jeanette Winterson has taken to heart Woolf's advice in A Room of One's Own that "a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction" (4), but Winterson has also, as M...   [tags: Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own]
:: 5 Works Cited
2795 words
(8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Issues in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway Essay - Issues in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway revolves around several of the issues that preoccupied the Bloomsbury writers and thinkers as a group. Issues of androgyny, class, madness, and mythology run throughout the novel. While that is hardly an exhaustive list, these notions seem to form the core of the structure of the novel. Woolf herself, when envisioning the project, sought to produce “a study of insanity and suicide, the world seen by the sane and the insane side by side.” This issue of madness, in particular, gives the novel its form as we follow the twinned lives of Septimus Warren Smith and Clarissa Dalloway....   [tags: Woolf] 624 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Deborah Tannen's Can't We Talk Essay examples - Deborah Tannen's Can't We Talk Deborah Tannen’s case study entitled “Can’t We Talk?” is the most relevant reading that I have ever done for any class. It relates to a problem that every person regardless of age, race or sex, will have to face many times in his or her lifetime. The problem is that men and women communicate differently and these differences can often lead to conflict. This case study is very informative because it helps to clarify the thought process of each sex. That said this reading leaves the reader somewhat unfulfilled because Tannen does not offer a solution to the problem....   [tags: Deborah Tannen Can't We Talk Essays] 1244 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Deborah Tall's From Where We Stand Essay - Deborah Tall's From Where We Stand In her book, From Where We Stand, Deborah Tall, tells us the story of coming to Geneva, New York, to begin teaching. It is a personal account of coming to terms with a new and foreign place. It gives us the chance of watching her learn about landscapes, people, and history. It moves through time, through her own life, and especially through motherhood. In the end, and after more than a decade, she gives us the signs of what it means to live out of and within the place where you are....   [tags: Deborah Tall Where Stand Essays] 1531 words
(4.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Virginia Woolf - Virginia Woolf Virginia Woolf was born in London, as the daughter of Julia Jackson Duckworth, a member of the Duckworth publishing family, and Sir Leslie Stephen, a literary critic, a friend of Meredith, Henry James, Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, and George Eliot, and the founder of the Dictionary of National Biography. Leslie Stephen's first wife had been the daughter of the novelist William Makepeace Thackeray. His daughter Laura from the first marriage was institutionalized because of mental retardation....   [tags: Author Writer Biography Woolf] 1700 words
(4.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]