Preview
Preview

Classism in "The Grapes of Wrath" Movie Essay

No Works Cited
Length: 1070 words (3.1 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Purple      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

In the year of 1939, the Great Depression affected the lives of many located within the United States. This was a severe, and most widespread depression which affected people across the world. For the reason that there was a fall of the stock market, a drought ravaged the agricultural heartland. Those who were dependent on their farmland to provide for their families became imposed by coercion to retreat and re-locate their entire families. This migration was a struggle during this period because the lack of resources and money to survive. Among other elements, starvation and homelessness caused many to die at an early age. John Steinbeck's, The Grapes of Wrath, exhibits the Joad's, a family who undergoes the collapse of the agrarian lifestyle, while forced to move their entire family to possibly a more advantageous situation. This presumed liberating destination California, is supposed to provide a positive outlook on the future of the Joad family. Similar to other families, the Joad's migrated towards an aspiration of a better life. Although there was a collaboration of feelings regarding this immense transition, a sense of struggle and hesitancy was prevalent as well. Within this complex struggle, there were different components created known as macro factors, which arose and ultimately affected the many families directly related to the situation.
The lack of work, food and resources to survive combined with the government outsourcing farmers left no alternative to migration. When serious situations begin to involve families as a whole, a sense of responsibility prevails over all other emotions. Unity, strength and leadership qualities are needed for progression. Members of the family are directly affected both i...


... middle of paper ...


...ue to believe. The fact that they are loyal to each other signifies the true kinship shared. The Joad family can be connected to the body of the migrant workers as they both represent a family unit, who lack a home and when life moves forward new connections are formed. Their beliefs, unity and strengths can be viewed as an organization who are fighting for a better life for their families. The police in the movie, are shown as one force related to the self-interest of the landowners and businessmen, in which they are driven to sustain a system that coerces thousands of families into poverty.
There are many key elements such as the historical, social and economic circumstances which separate the different families into rich and poor. This division that is made between the population can be identified as the primary source of evil and suffering in the world.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Quotes Indicating Morality in The Grapes of Wrath Essay - Themes: People often give up everything that have for others, not because they have a lot to give, but because they know what it feels like to have nothing. Quote: “She looked at Rose of Sharon huddled in the comfort. Ma’s eyes passed Rose of Sharon’s eyes passed Rose of Sharon’s eyes and then came back to them. And the two women looked deep into each other” (454). These were the actions taken before Rose of Sharon helps the starving stranger in the barn by feeding him her breast milk. Even though the Joads have never met this man, they know what it is like to be hungry and to suffer....   [tags: The Grapes of Wrath] 988 words
(2.8 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Essay about Finding Hope in The Grapes of Wrath - Finding Hope in The Grapes of Wrath Having watched the movie "Grapes of Wrath", I have been given the opportunity to see the troubles that would have befell migrant workers during the Great Depression. Though the Joads were a fictitious family, I was able to identify with many signs of hope that they could hold onto. Some of these families who made the journey in real life carried on when all they had was hope. The three major signs of hope which I discovered were, overcoming adversity, finding jobs, and completing the journey....   [tags: The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck] 624 words
(1.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Free Grapes of Wrath Essays: Religion in The Grapes of Wrath - Religion in The Grapes of Wrath In The Grapes of Wrath the author, John Steinbeck, presents religion in several ways including the fanaticism of the Sin Watchers, Jim Casy’s parallel character to Jesus Christ, and through the use of symbolism throughout the novel. Through these methods, Steinbeck weaves a web in which religion is presented as a double-edged blade; one can go to the path of being truly a devout, kind person, or one can choose the path of zealously, condemning all who would oppose or go against their views....   [tags: Grapes Wrath essays] 457 words
(1.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Grapes of Wrath Essay: Naturalism in The Grapes of Wrath - Naturalism in The Grapes of Wrath In John Steinbeck's novel The Grapes of Wrath, the Joad family and the changing world in which they live is portrayed from a naturalistic point of view. Steinbeck characterizes the Joads and their fellow migrants as simple, instinct-bound creatures who are on an endless search for paradise (Owens 129). The migrants and the powers which force them to make their journey--nature and society--are frequently represented by animals. The Joads, when they initially leave home, are a group of simplistic, animal-like people who barely understand or even realize their plight, but as the story progresses, they begin to grow and adapt to their new circumsta...   [tags: Grapes Wrath essays] 1414 words
(4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Bonds With the Land in The Grapes of Wrath Essay - The Grapes of Wrath: Bonds With the Land To human beings, environment is vital. After spending a number of years in one place, it is very human to become attached. This is especially true with farmers. They spend their lives learning the land around them. The land becomes a friend to them, having almost human value. In the novel The Grapes of Wrath, author John Steinbeck conveys the connection people have with their land, without which they feel they cannot survive mentally or physically....   [tags: The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck] 496 words
(1.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Man and Nature in The Grapes of Wrath Essay - Man and Nature in The Grapes of Wrath    In The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck uses both obvious references and subtle contrasts to emphasize the main theme of the novel: the sanctity of man's relationship to the natural world and to each other.   Machines have no place in this relationship. They act as a barrier between men and the land. They are dangerous because they perform the function of men with greater efficiency, but they lack the spiritual element that makes the land so valuable....   [tags: Grapes Wrath essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
664 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Free Grapes of Wrath Essays: Steinbeck's Political Agenda - Political Agenda in The Grapes of Wrath The Grapes of Wrath is a movie that was originally a novel by John Steinbeck that exposes the desperate conditions under which the migratory farm families of America during the 1930's live. The movie tells of one family that migrates west to California through the great economic depression of the 1930's. The Joad family had to abandon their home and their livelihoods. They had to uproot and set adrift because tractors were rapidly industrializing their farms along with the erosion of topsoil to create "the Dust Bowl"....   [tags: Grapes Wrath essays] 574 words
(1.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Steinbeck's Style in The Grapes of Wrath Essay - Different Styles in The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck used a lot of different styles in The Grapes of Wrath. He liked using language that was in keeping with his characters. He was also really big on symbolism. Steinbeck also used intercalary chapters to provide some of the background information. John Steinbeck must have loved using slang and natural dialect. All of his characters spoke with a very heavy accents. "Tell 'em ya dong's growed scence you los' your eye." (P. 180). Granted, this does add some realism....   [tags: Grapes Wrath essays] 487 words
(1.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about The Setting of Grapes of Wrath - The Setting of Grapes of Wrath The Grapes of Wrath does not have one specific setting, but rather travels from Okalahoma to California. The setting in this novel is realistic because you can follow the Joads journey on a map. Accuracy to the novel was very important to Steinbeck because he wanted this novel to be a social document rather then just another piece of fiction. The main characters in the novel are sharecroppers turned into migrant workers much of the stetting is taken place outdoors....   [tags: The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck] 781 words
(2.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Themes in The Grapes of Wrath Essay - Themes in The Grapes of Wrath There are several different themes in The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck. Here I will go into depth on those. The three main themes in the story are free will versus necessity, the holiness of every man, and the kinship of all man. The main theme (and the most important, in my opinion) is free will versus necessity. All throughout the story, the characters are forced to do something either because they want to or they have to. A good example would be Ma's burning her old souvenirs when they leave for California....   [tags: The Grapes of Wrath John Steinbeck] 433 words
(1.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]