Preview
Preview

Americanization in The Joy Luck Club Essay

:: 7 Works Cited
Length: 1951 words (5.6 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Aqua      
Open Document




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Americanization in The Joy Luck Club








Oftentimes the children of immigrants to the United States lose the sense of cultural background in which their parents had tried so desperately to instill within them. According to Walter Shear, “It is an unseen terror that runs through both the distinct social spectrum experienced by the mothers in China and the lack of such social definition in the daughters’ lives.” This “unseen terror” is portrayed in Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club as four Chinese women and their American-born daughters struggle to understand one another’s culture and values. The second-generation women in The Joy Luck Club prove to lose their sense of Chinese values, becoming Americanized.
The Joy Luck Club daughters incontestably become Americanized as they continue to grow up. They lose their sense of Chinese values, or Chinese tradition in which their mothers tried to drill into their minds. The four young women adopt the American culture and way of life, and they think differently than their traditional Chinese mothers do, upsetting the mothers greatly. The daughters do not even understand the culture of their mothers, and vice versa. They find that the American way of thinking is very different from that of the Chinese.
Amy Tan is a Chinese-American author. She had become Americanized, according to her mother, who still held traditional Chinese values. They fought sometimes, just as the women and daughters of The Joy Luck Club, over who was right and who was wrong regarding many problems they encountered. Tan most likely modeled The Joy Luck Club after her relationship with her mother. She even dedicated the novel “To my mother and the memory of her mother. You asked me once what I wo...


... middle of paper ...


...1995). 1995. Women and Language.

Dedmon, Emmett. China Journal. Printed in U.S.A. Rand McNally and Company, 1973. Ch. 12.

Ho, Wendy. Swan-Feather Mothers and Coca-Cola Daughters: Teaching Amy Tan’s Joy Luck Club. An excerpt from Teaching American Ethnic Literatures/ Nineteen Essays, ed. By John R. Maitino and David R. Peck. 1996. University of New Mexico Press.

Shear, Walter. Generational Differences and the Diaspora in The Joy Luck Club. An excerpt from Critique, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Spring 1993). 1993. Helen Dwight Reid Educational Foundation.

Tan, Amy. The Joy Luck Club. Published by Penguin Books 1989. New York, New York, U.S.A.

Xu, Ben. Memory and the Ethnic Self: Reading Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club. An excerpt from MELEUS, Vol. 19, No.1 (Spring 1994). 1994. The Society for Study of Multi-Ethnic Literature of the U.S. 5 May 2010.




Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan Essay examples - Traditions, heritage and culture are three of the most important aspects of Chinese culture. Passed down from mother to daughter, these traditions are expected to carry on for years to come. In Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club, daughters Waverly, Lena, Rose and June thoughts about their culture are congested by Americanization while on their quests towards self-actualization. Each daughter struggles to find balance between Chinese heritage and American values through marriage and professional careers....   [tags: The Joy Luck Club Essays] 772 words
(2.2 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Joy Luck Club - Playing the Game Essay - The Joy Luck Club - Playing the Game A vivid portrait of the struggles, as well as the joys, of three generations of Asian American families is painted for us on the off white canvas used by Amy Tan in 1989, the pages of her book, The Joy Luck Club. In this portrayal of Chinese immigrants and their American born children, four family stories are brought to light, through a series of vignettes told from the view points of eight women, as they change and grow in their lives. Lives that become the pigment that, along with Tan’s taintless brush strokes become a painting fit for a museum....   [tags: Free Essay Writer] 1240 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Deception in The Joy Luck Club Essay - Deception binds the characters of the Joy Luck Club together. In the Joy Luck Club, Amy Tan depicts deception at almost every turn in the novel. Mothers often help their daughters through deceptive comments; husbands hide secrets from their wives through deceptive acts. Even best friends deceive each other as they struggle for one reason or another. Throughout the story, deception is an irreplaceable tool for parenting; for attempting to keep marriages together, or maintaining friendships. From time to time, it grows out of control from a benign lecture to a life changing scam....   [tags: The Joy Luck Club Essays] 876 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on The Joy Luck Club - The Joy Luck Club, by Amy Tan shows a group of families and their difficulties throughout their lives. In a section of the novel Lindo Jong, a Chinese mother, is reflecting and explaining the past that she endured; especially one specific experience that had a severe impact on her life. She, like many other characters in novels, is eventually pulled into a situation where there are two possible choices which will affect the life of the character in an important way and in that scenario the character much make a difficult choice between the two....   [tags: The Joy Luck Club Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
664 words
(1.9 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The American Dream in The Joy Luck Club Essay - The American Dream can mean a number of different things to number of different people. Over the years this ideal has evolved and its definition will continue to change for many more years to come. What has not changed is the desire to achieve this dream. For decades now, people from all over the world have immigrated to the United States with hopes of obtaining this dream. However it seems that, to many immigrants the American dream has a very different and more modest definition. To many foreigners it means having the basic necessities in life and giving their children opportunities and life they ever had....   [tags: Essays on The Joy Luck Club] 1800 words
(5.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on The Joy Luck Club, by Amy Tan - The movie, The Joy Luck Club, focuses around the lives of four Chinese mothers and their Chinese-American daughters. The story takes place a few months after Junes mother, Suyuan has died. The mothers and daughters hold very different principles, where the mothers are still very traditional to their Chinese upbringings the daughters are much more “American.” The movie can be viewed from the Feminist Literary Theory, since the 8 main characters are female. The women’s life stories are told through a series of flashback scenes that deal heavily with female gender roles and the expectations of women....   [tags: The Joy Luck Club Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1002 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Gender in The Joy Luck Club Essay - The Joy Luck Club By Amy Tan Is it fair to judge someone by their sex. In traditional Chinese culture, many judgments were made about a person just by observing their sex. The woman was looked upon as an inferior being. They had little or no status in society, and little was expected from them. They were discriminated against when they tried to stand up for themselves. Chinese culture was customarily male dominated. The male was expected to do most of the work, and the woman was expected to stay at home with their mouth shut....   [tags: The Joy Luck Club Essays] 1051 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Joy Luck Club Essay - The Joy Luck Club retold the lives of four women who came from China and their four Americanized daughters. The protagonist, Jing Mei Woo (June) took over her mother’s place at the meetings of a social group called the Joy Luck Club. As its members play mah jong and feast on Chinese delicacies, friends of Jing Mei’s mother spin stories about the past and lament the barriers that exist between their daughter and themselves. In this paper, I will discuss briefly on cultural studies and the Chinese Immigrant Experience and Individual Identity that is very evident in this novel....   [tags: The Joy Luck Club Essays] 732 words
(2.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Joy Luck Club Essay - It is true that all people are created different, and thus no two cultures will ever be the same. Throughout Asian American literature there seems to be a struggle between the Asian culture and American culture. More specifically, there is a struggle between Asian women and their Asian American daughters, and what it means to be feminine, and how a woman should act. The main struggle is between how the American woman should act and how the Asian woman should act. However, the behavior of the Asian woman seems to be dominant through out the story because although the daughters and the mothers may not get along all of the time, the mothers to receive a lot of respect from their daughters....   [tags: The Joy Luck Club Essays] 1715 words
(4.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Amy Tan's Joy Luck Club Essay examples - Throughout The Joy Luck Club Amy Tan inserts various conflicts betweens mothers and daughters. Most of these relationships, already very fragile, become distanced through heritage, history and expectations. These differences cause reoccurring clashes between two specific mother-daughter bonds. The first relationship exists between Waverly Jong and her mother, Lindo. Lindo tries to instill Chinese qualities in her daughter while Waverly refuses to recognize her heritage and concentrates on American culture....   [tags: The Joy Luck Club Essays] 1075 words
(3.1 pages)
Good Essays [preview]